A Refreshing Perspective from a Daddy Blogger

From the first moments we see our children (and hold them in our arms), we want to make sure that we are doing whatever we can to give them the best shot at a healthy, happy life.

            -Don, DaddyNewbie.com

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This is how Don from DaddyNewbie.com begins his review of How to Raise Emotionally Healthy Children on his blog.

He goes on to say about the Five Critical Emotional Needs identified in the book, “Dr. Newmark also does a really good job of discussing why all these things are essential for every child, what you can do to ensure that these needs are met, and how these factors evolve through the growth and development of every child.”

Don’s conclusion?

 I highly recommend adding this book to your arsenal of resources.

It was refreshing to read a review from the perspective of a father. Don talks about his experiences and uses metaphors that some fathers (AND mothers) might be more likely to relate to. To see some examples, read the rest of Don’s review HERE!

Don is from St. Louis, Missouri  a father of two, and the Founder & CEO of DaddyNewbie.com

How to Raise Emotionally Healthy Children is available in paperback and ebook in both English and Spanish.

***Visit us at The Children’s Project, LIKE us on Facebook, or follow us on on Twitter!***

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“Go to church, never get in trouble, & father always knows best?”: An ’emotionally healthy’ book review & giveaway

A book review of How
to Raise Emotionally Healthy Children
from Far from
Camelot

Part of the reason I
accepted this book to review was because I felt like I did not
receive an emotionally healthy upbringing.

My childhood was nourished in a bubble of fantasy – to
this day my parents refuse to accept the reality of today’s
society. They grew up in the idyllic 1950′s and they raised me in
that same atmosphere as well. They had three rules: go to church,
never get in trouble, and father always knows best.

20130807-081755.jpg This is all fine and dandy until the child becomes
a teenager with a will of her own. What do you do when you want to
break out of your sheltered existence to experience the real world
but your parents tell you their experiences ended negatively so you
must stay inside where it is safe? I was never trusted, always
guilty until proven innocent. Eventually I got tired of fighting
for my innocence and the opportunity to enjoy the fun of a
teenager’s life. I didn’t get into drugs or get knocked up at 16,
but I did do a lot of other stupid stuff. Stuff that is really
child’s play in the world of today’s teenagers. At one point my
parents took me to see a therapist, who sided with them in every
instance, in hopes that I would “see the errors” of my ways. Oh
yeah, that sure happened! Continue
reading for full review and book giveaway!
Our
book How
to Raise Emotionally Healthy Children
is
available from Amazon paperback
and in both English and
Spanish.
***As always, you can visit us at The Children’s
Project
website, LIKE us on Facebook,
or follow
us
on on Twitter!***

LOVE is an action word

20130801-215310.jpg
In How to Raise Emotionally Healthy Children, Dr. Gerald Newmark defines the five critical emotional needs of children – and parents, too – as:

    The need to feel INCLUDED
    The need to feel RESPECTED
    The need to feel IMPORTANT
    The need to feel ACCEPTED
    The need to feel SECURE

Perhaps you have asked yourself, “What about love? Why hasn’t love been included as one of the five critical needs of children?” It was omitted purposefully, not because it lacks importance—on the contrary, it is extremely important—but rather because the word “love” has lost some of its force and meaning through overuse and misuse.

In many cases, saying the words “I love you” has become trite, meaningless, or confusing. In a scene from the movie Nuts, a conversation takes place between a mother and her estranged daughter: The mother says to the daughter, “You know we love you sweetheart, don’t you? Didn’t we always tell you we loved you?” To which the daughter replies angrily, “Love? What do you know about love? You told me you loved me, but you never showed me you did.” Yes, there is a difference.

There are parents who abuse or neglect their children and then say, “I love you,” thinking it makes up for their behavior. Too often, love is equated with saying “I love you.” If saying “I love you” were enough, we might not have such a high divorce rate. Marriages don’t break up because a spouse stops saying “I love you.” They break up because spouses quit treating each other in a loving way.

Most parents love their children or so we assume. However, we cannot assume from this that most parents act in a loving way. Dr. Newmark’s answer to “What about love?” is that loving your child is essential and saying “I love you” is important, but neither is sufficient unless you act in a loving way. That is why he defines “acting in a loving way” as relating to children in ways that make the child feel respected, important, accepted, included, and secure—that’s the best way to say, “I love you.”

Our book How to Raise Emotionally Healthy Children is available from Amazon in paperback and Kindle ebook in both English and Spanish.

***As always, you can visit us at The Children’s Project website, LIKE us on Facebook, or follow us on on Twitter!***